Joseph Goddard

Artist

Artist website for Joseph Goddard.

Leeds based artist concerned with postwar architecture, sculpture, painting, photography, Brutalism.

John Moores Prize Winners, Liverpool.

The John Moores Painting prize was established in 1957 and has been a mainstay on the British art scene ever since. Held at the Walker Street Gallery, Liverpool, every 2 years, it coincides with The Liverpool Biennale, providing emerging and established artists with a platform for national and international recognition. On display are a selection of prize winning paintings spanning 60 years’ worth of competition.

Art competitions have become a hugely popular trend of late, not just with galleries but with magazines and websites and the far reach of the internet means the growing number of competitions are even more visible. With the whole concept nearing saturation point, the validity and significance of such competitions is something to be considered. However, John Moores Painting Prize has the history and pedigree to separate it from the younglings of the competition trend. With previous winners including David Hockney, Mary Martin and Peter Blake, John Moores Prize Winners is demonstratively a programme intended to showcase contemporary painting at its best and arguably at its purest; street art, urban art, the current tends of social media driven art aesthetics is notable only for its omission. The work on display is distinctly institutional art; made for gallery spaces, championed by the establishment and more importantly exhibited to be subjected to considerable analysis. It is a collection of works that help chart the key moments of British painting over the last several decades, abstraction, realism, colour field and figurative artworks sit side by side acting as an archival testament to post-war British painting.

In comparison to the actual competition, John Moores prizewinners has a perceptible different tone. Whereas the competition can often feel giddy with eclecticism John Moores prizewinners has a more matter of fact quality, prosaic in its sense of self-assurance. Highlights of the show include Lisa Milroy’s ‘Handles’, 1989 a work which seems defiant and authoritative in its methodical rigour. Rose Wylie ‘PVC Windows and Floorboards’, 2014 adds a sense of fun and energy to the show, with its lively use of colour and shape it is instantly endearing in its playfulness.

Taking in John Moores prizewinners as a retrospective allows the viewer a certain distancing form the progress of recent British painting. As a snap shot of contemporary painting it is hard not to view John Moores as a prognosticator for the most significant contributors to the art world. A possible marker for this and standout of the show is Peter Doigs ‘The Blotter’, 1998. Doig was the recipient of the award in 1993 before receiving the Turner Prize a year later. Doig’s work sets itself apart from his peers at the time by not falling into the brash headline grabbing sensationalism of the Young British Art movement. Blotter illustrates perfectly what most of his work achieves, a sense of solemn isolation, a quality of quietness and deep contemplation. It elicits a sensation with which to frame the show, a mind state which the show deserves, one of deliberate regard.

The John Moores Painting prize was established in 1957 and has been a mainstay on the British art scene ever since. Held at the Walker Street Gallery, Liverpool, every 2 years, it coincides with The Liverpool Biennale, providing emerging and established artists with a platform for national and international recognition. On display are a selection of prize winning paintings spanning 60 years’ worth of competition.

Art competitions have become a hugely popular trend of late, not just with galleries but with magazines and websites and the far reach of the internet means the growing number of competitions are even more visible. With the whole concept nearing saturation point, the validity and significance of such competitions is something to be considered. However, John Moores Painting Prize has the history and pedigree to separate it from the younglings of the competition trend. With previous winners including David Hockney, Mary Martin and Peter Blake, John Moores Prize Winners is demonstratively a programme intended to showcase contemporary painting at its best and arguably at its purest; street art, urban art, the current tends of social media driven art aesthetics is notable only for its omission. The work on display is distinctly institutional art; made for gallery spaces, championed by the establishment and more importantly exhibited to be subjected to considerable analysis. It is a collection of works that help chart the key moments of British painting over the last several decades, abstraction, realism, colour field and figurative artworks sit side by side acting as an archival testament to post-war British painting.

In comparison to the actual competition, John Moores prizewinners has a perceptible different tone. Whereas the competition can often feel giddy with eclecticism John Moores prizewinners has a more matter of fact quality, prosaic in its sense of self-assurance. Highlights of the show include Lisa Milroy’s ‘Handles’, 1989 a work which seems defiant and authoritative in its methodical rigour. Rose Wylie ‘PVC Windows and Floorboards’, 2014 adds a sense of fun and energy to the show, with its lively use of colour and shape it is instantly endearing in its playfulness.

Taking in John Moores prizewinners as a retrospective allows the viewer a certain distancing form the progress of recent British painting. As a snap shot of contemporary painting it is hard not to view John Moores as a prognosticator for the most significant contributors to the art world. A possible marker for this and standout of the show is Peter Doigs ‘The Blotter’, 1998. Doig was the recipient of the award in 1993 before receiving the Turner Prize a year later. Doig’s work sets itself apart from his peers at the time by not falling into the brash headline grabbing sensationalism of the Young British Art movement. Blotter illustrates perfectly what most of his work achieves, a sense of solemn isolation, a quality of quietness and deep contemplation. It elicits a sensation with which to frame the show, a mind state which the show deserves, one of deliberate regard.